Currently Browsing: Ann Bernard

Silk, Stockings and Clogs, by Janet Sunderani

1980s Britain was a difficult time to graduate from university. With a degree in English and no discernible job skills apart from a willing heart and an urgent need to earn my keep I felt very lucky to land a job with a textile company in the Midlands. Filigree Textiles made knitted voile, Jacquard lace, […]

CONTINUE READING

From Lace Back to Stockings

The last posting on Lace triggered some interesting responses. Among them was the fact that a wedding dress was made of Nottingham Lace. Another reader wondered where one finds pieces of chunky old lace with which to play creatively. A third observed that the only place in the UK where lace continues to be manufactured […]

CONTINUE READING

Some History of Lace

It is a long time since you have heard from me. Life got in the way. I would like to introduce you to Janet Sunderani. Reading this Blog brought back her memories of growing up in the Nottingham area of England and the stories she heard from her grandparents and neighbours who worked in the […]

CONTINUE READING

The Art of the Lacemaker: Exhibition at the Guelph Civic Museum

The Ruhland Collection: For the Love of Lace “Lace is an art form … very precise and delicate. It takes years for a craftsman to perfect … and just as many years to learn and appreciate his work.” Margaret Ruhland, Ottawa Citizen, 1988 An Exhibition of Lace is a rare event. Come to think about […]

CONTINUE READING

Beginners Gold Work Class

First, an apology. I have not forgotten about this blog but have been busy working on my eBook on Summer Flowers. It is progressing well but such a project takes up a huge amount of time. Publication is delayed until the fall as I would like to appreciate the summer weather after our endless winter. […]

CONTINUE READING

1870s in Britain: a Breakthrough for Education, Textiles and Embroidery

By the 1870s, there had been radical changes in Britain. The Industrial Revolution had been in progress for a century. The sources of power such as water, steam and electricity were developing and being accepted, manufacturing machinery was widely used, transportation systems were growing as were imports and exports, there had been a mass migration […]

CONTINUE READING

Getting Closer to the Founding of the Royal School of Needlework

Life’s events often seem to be the outcome of other events and a grand intermingling of individual and historical influences. Far fetched though it may seem, the founding of the Royal School of Needlework (RSN) was one of the outcomes of the Industrial Revolution. In Britain, this started in the mid 1700s with the invention […]

CONTINUE READING

Berlin Wool Work

The course of research does not always flow smoothly in the intended direction but often leads one to other destinations. But as all endeavours, including embroidery, are influenced by other factors, then one needs to take notice of the other players in the field. One major influence was Leek Embroidery. Another one is Berlin Wool […]

CONTINUE READING

Dyeing and the Silk Industry During the Late 1800s

This article is an introduction to the next one which will be about Leek Embroidery Thomas Wardle (1831-1909) of Leek in Staffordshire was an English dye chemist and printer who devoted much of his life to development of the textile printing industry employing both locally woven and imported fabrics. He had widespread interests, considerable energy […]

CONTINUE READING

Another Beryl Dean Embroidery

Earlier this week, while looking for something else, I found a photo of another of Beryl Dean’s panels. They were commissioned by The Friends of St George’s Chapel. This Chapel is within the grounds of Windsor Castle. This one, The Annunciation, is the first in a series of five. The finished size is 9′ x […]

CONTINUE READING