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The medieval tapestry depicting the Battle of Hastings is to leave France and head for England for first time in 950 years

Jan 25, 2018 Nikola Budanovic Reprinted from The Vintage News – Jan 26, 2018 First, an answer to a question. Magna Carta Panels; “Get out and get under” photo. Yes, it is unusual to have to do this. It is sometimes necessary when repairing old textiles that cannot be rolled onto the wooden frame bars. […]

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MAGNA CARTA (AN EMBROIDERY) with thanks to information on Wikipedia

Moving to more recent times, the Magna Carta (an Embroidery) commemorates the 800th Anniversary of the signing of this document by King John and the Barons. It is the charter of rights and freedoms and formed the base of the Constitution of England and many other countries, Magna Carta (An Embroidery) is a 2015 work […]

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The Hastings Embroidery.

For those who are unaware of this national treasure, here are some facts: The Hastings Embroidery was commissioned by Group Captain Ralph Ward, or, the County Borough of Hastings. It was made by the Royal School of Needlework in 1965 to celebrate the 900th anniversary of the Battle of Hastings in 1966. It consists of […]

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The Sequel to the Battle of Hastings.

King William’s victory was not welcomed by the Saxon population but it would be have been surprising if it had been.  The next months were stormy and he was crowned king on Christmas Day, 1066 in a deliberately empty Westminster Abbey.  England was a country of separate areas and each one had its own Saxon […]

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The Bayeux Story continues

The wind direction changed allowing the Norman armada to sail.  On September 29, 1066, Duke William with his army, equipment and a multitude of horses landed in Pevensey Bay on the south coast of England and then moved east to the area of Hastings where they set up camp. They built defenses plus a castle […]

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The Battle of Stamford Bridge

Having won the Battle of Fulford Gate, the Vikings took time off. They did not burn the City of York as they had Scarborough but, as victors, they collected tribute in the form of goods and hostages. For late September, the weather was unseasonably hot. The Vikings made camp on the western and the eastern […]

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Silk, Stockings and Clogs, by Janet Sunderani

1980s Britain was a difficult time to graduate from university. With a degree in English and no discernible job skills apart from a willing heart and an urgent need to earn my keep I felt very lucky to land a job with a textile company in the Midlands. Filigree Textiles made knitted voile, Jacquard lace, […]

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From Lace Back to Stockings

The last posting on Lace triggered some interesting responses. Among them was the fact that a wedding dress was made of Nottingham Lace. Another reader wondered where one finds pieces of chunky old lace with which to play creatively. A third observed that the only place in the UK where lace continues to be manufactured […]

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Some History of Lace

It is a long time since you have heard from me. Life got in the way. I would like to introduce you to Janet Sunderani. Reading this Blog brought back her memories of growing up in the Nottingham area of England and the stories she heard from her grandparents and neighbours who worked in the […]

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The Art of the Lacemaker: Exhibition at the Guelph Civic Museum

The Ruhland Collection: For the Love of Lace “Lace is an art form … very precise and delicate. It takes years for a craftsman to perfect … and just as many years to learn and appreciate his work.” Margaret Ruhland, Ottawa Citizen, 1988 An Exhibition of Lace is a rare event. Come to think about […]

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